Blog

Image from page 1088 of “The art of taming and educating the horse : with details of management in the subjection of over forty representative vicious horses, and the story of the author’s personal experience : together with chapters on feeding, stabling,

Image from page 1088 of “The art of taming and educating the horse : with details of management in the subjection of over forty representative vicious horses, and the story of the author’s personal experience : together with chapters on feeding, stabling,
Healing Arts
Identifier: artoftamingeduca00magn
Title: The art of taming and educating the horse : with details of management in the subjection of over forty representative vicious horses, and the story of the author’s personal experience : together with chapters on feeding, stabling, shoeing, and the practical treatment for sickness, lameness, etc. : with a large number of recipes
Year: 1886 (1880s)
Authors: Magner, D. (Dennis), b. 1833
Subjects: Horses Horses
Publisher: Battle Creek, Mich. : Review and Herald Pub. House
Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
worstcharacter, without doing anygood, and at large expense.He finally treated the case asthis man directed, and aftei-three applications the curewas complete. Others stated that the man had treated cases forthem, with the same success. The writer would be greatly obliged to parties giving thisremedy a trial, if they would report to him the results. Since writing the above, I requested a veterinary surgeon ofmy acquaintance to give this a trial, when he had a case offeredfor treatment. A very bad case of poll evil was brought in fromthe country; there were two deep cavities, and he directed theowner to fill them with the ashes. Some time afterward, the manreported that both ulcers were healed over, but one of them hadagain broken out. Upon inquiry, it was found that instead ofsimply filling the cavities, and leaving them alone without furtherattention, the man kept adding more each day, causing them toheal too quickly. There is no doubt that, when used as direcfettd, it will be found

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 852.—Showing seatou. 990 DISEASES AND THEIK TEEATMENT. a decidedly effective means of treatment. Its simplicity and safetymake it deserving of a trial before resorting to regular treatment. The following remedy is used by veterinary surgeons of myacquaintance as a remedy of great value, and is kept a secretThe point in iising it is, to saturate a little tow with it, and j^ushit to the bottom of the ulcer, so that it will touch every part of it.In about twenty-four hours the diseased part can be separatedfrom the healthy flesh with the finger, from the top to the bottom,and taken out, when it is to be dressed as a simple wound:— 4 ounces accetate of copper (verdegris),•i ounces sulphate of copper (blue vitriol),4 ounces alum, 1 ounce white precipitate (white mercury), 2 ounces nitric acid,1 pound honey. Diseases of the Eye. The eye, or organ of vision, is composed of three tunics, orcoats, and of the same number of humors. To the external coat(sclerotic and cornea) it owes i

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

no comment

Leave a Reply