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Image from page 135 of “Journeys through Bookland : a new and original plan for reading applied to the world’s best literature for children” (1922)

Image from page 135 of “Journeys through Bookland : a new and original plan for reading applied to the world’s best literature for children” (1922)
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Identifier: journeysthroughb01sylv
Title: Journeys through Bookland : a new and original plan for reading applied to the world’s best literature for children
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Sylvester, Charles Herbert
Subjects: Children’s literature
Publisher: Chicago : Bellows-Reeve
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
re. We can do this very easily, forwhile they are playing about we can slip away with-out being seen. O husband! you surely can never consent to thedeath of your own children. I cannot believe thatyou mean it. I never will agree to such a thing. *Well, said the father, with a breaking heart,it is either do that or all starve here together; andperhaps if we take them out into the woods andleave them the Lord will provide for them. It was a long time before the wife would consentto this, for she was the childrens mother and lovedthem all; but finally, weeping as though her heartwould break, she gave her consent and went sobbingto bed. Now when his parents began to talk about thismatter, little Hop-o-my-thumb had not yet goneto sleep; and hearing his mother weeping he creptsoftly away from the bed where he slept with hisbrothers, and hid himself under his fathers chairthat he might listen closely to every word they spoke.When they went off to bed he crept back into his 114 Hop-O-My-Thumb

Text Appearing After Image:
HOP-O -MY-THUMB UKOPlED PEBBLIiS warm place and spent the rest of the night thinkingof what he had heard. Next morning as soon as it began to grow hghthe got out of bed and went to a brook that flowednear the house, where he filled his pockets with smallwhite pebbles, and then ran back to the house. Not long after this the father called the childrenabout him and set out for the woods. When theycame to a very dense place in the forest, the fatherand mother left the boys to gather twigs and tiethem in bundles while they went a little farther intothe woods. The trees grew so thick that when theywere a few yards away from the children they couldnot be seen, and so it was not at all difficult forthem to leave the children without being discovered. Little Hop-omy-thumb had said nothing to anyof the boys about what he knew, but he had takengood pains to drop his white pebbles in the pathover which they had come, so that he knew verywell he could find his way home again. After a while the boy

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