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Image from page 300 of “The elements of surgery : in which are contained all the essential and necessary principles of the art ; with an account of the nature and treatment of chirurgical disorders, and a description of the operations, bandages, instrumen

Image from page 300 of “The elements of surgery : in which are contained all the essential and necessary principles of the art ; with an account of the nature and treatment of chirurgical disorders, and a description of the operations, bandages, instrumen
Healing Arts
Identifier: elementsofsurger00mihl
Title: The elements of surgery : in which are contained all the essential and necessary principles of the art ; with an account of the nature and treatment of chirurgical disorders, and a description of the operations, bandages, instruments, and dressings, according to the modern and most approved practice ; adapted to the use of the camp and navy, as well as of the domestic surgeon ; illustrated with twenty-five copper-plates
Year: 1746 (1740s)
Authors: Mihles, Samuel
Subjects: Surgical Procedures, Operative Surgery Surgery, Operative Surgery, Military
Publisher: London : Printed for J. and P. Knapton
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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Text Appearing Before Image:
et with narrower fhoulders anda ftill fhorter blade, forming a more acute angletowards the point, being called by the French anoat-grained point, being more fuitable than theformer for the fmaller and deeper veins. . Fig. 3. Reprefents a fmaller oat-grained lancet,extremely commodious for bleeding eafy in a fkil-ful hand, and when a vein does not eafily appear. Fig. 4. Reprefents one of the moft acute-point-ed lancets, called by the French a ferpentine point:being ufeful for bleeding eafy in a fkilful hand, andto open very fmall veins in an infant, -under thetongue, in. the white of the eye, &c. Fig. 5. Reprefents a fmall abfcefs lancet fixedin a ring, fo as to be commodioufly concealed inthe hand, when there is occafion to make an inci-fion, under a pretence of healing the part, in atimorous patient who will not admit of the knife. Fig. 6. Reprefents the trefine, fo called byWoo&al from its having three ends, and prevailsamong us more than the trepan, as it may be more Iab in

Text Appearing After Image:
283 ) more conveniently held or directed to prefs moreon one fide than the other, according as thethicknefs of the bone may require. AC thehandle of the trefine, into which is fixed the crownB, which is made cylindrical, or at leaft verynearly fo -, inftead of being conical like the crownof the trepan, Tab. a. Fig. i. which greatly ex-pedites the working of the inftrument, which be-ing performed more flowly, and with more exact-nels and regularity than the trepan, is not in dan-ger of wounding the brain in a careful hand j toavoid which, the crown of the trepan was at firftformed of a conical fhape. So that what in thisrefpecl: feemed to be a very great improvement up-on the ancients about an hundred years ago, is atprefent thought rather an incumbrance and im-pediment in a Ikilful and careful hand. Howeverit muff, be confeffed, that the trepan, Tab. E.Fig. i. ftill prevails in moft other parts of Europe;though the trefine is preferred by the moft expertfurgeons here at London. Fig. 7

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