Image from page 442 of “Postoperative treatment; an epitome of the general management of postoperative care and treatment of surgical cases as practised by prominent American and European surgeons” (1907)

Image from page 442 of "Postoperative treatment; an epitome of the general management of postoperative care and treatment of surgical cases as practised by prominent American and European surgeons" (1907)
Pain Management
Identifier: postoperativetr00mors
Title: Postoperative treatment; an epitome of the general management of postoperative care and treatment of surgical cases as practised by prominent American and European surgeons
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Morse, Nathan Clark. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Operations, Surgical. [from old catalog]
Publisher: Philadelphia, P. Blakiston's son & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Text Appearing Before Image:
third day—and should becontinued daily. Passivemovements of the elbow may commence about the tenth day, providedthat the healing process has proceeded favorably and the measure canbe borne by the patient without undue pain. In children such move-ments may at first be required to be carried out under an anesthetic.When four or five weeks have elapsed, the forearm may be graduallybrought up until it forms a right angle to the arm. At the end of sixor eight weeks the splint may be dispensed with, and the movementsof the elbow should be free. Active movements, aided by massage andgalvanism, should now be advised; and within four months from thetime of the operation the new joint should have acquired solidity andbe capable of exhibiting a free and extensive range of movements.. Excision of the elbow has led, on the whole, to very satisfactory results,and in a large proportion of the more favorable cases the results havebeen most admirable. Even if ankylosis occurs at a right angle, the27

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 136.—Elbow Splint.—(Strohmeyer.) 4i8 POSTOPERATIVE TREATMENT. limb is in a better condition than it was while diseased. In the moreunfortunate instances repair is imperfect for various reasons, and avery loose false joint, resulting in a flail-like limb, is the final production.Even in such a case a good deal may be done by means of a suitablesplint; the apparatus shown in Fig. 136 has proved most efficient. Itconsists of two pieces, one of which grasps the upper arm and the otherthe forearm, the two being connected by a metal band over each side ofthe elbow, jointed to permit of flexion and extension. This apparatusprevents lateral mobility, and, if worn for some months, it is quite pos-sible that a joint which was at first very lax may finally be quite satis-factory. RESECTION OF JOINTS. Resection of the Wrist-joint.—After resection of the wrist-joint thewrist should be dressed as nearly straight as possible, Esmarchs interrup-

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