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Image from page 612 of “A dictionary of arts, manufactures and mines : containing a clear exposition of their principles and practice” (1845)

Image from page 612 of “A dictionary of arts, manufactures and mines : containing a clear exposition of their principles and practice” (1845)
Healing Arts
Identifier: dictionaryofarts01urea
Title: A dictionary of arts, manufactures and mines : containing a clear exposition of their principles and practice
Year: 1845 (1840s)
Authors: Ure, Andrew, 1778-1857
Subjects: Industrial arts Technology
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : D. Appleton & Co.
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
t, the twojaws join by the force of the spring g, which pushes the moveable jaw e against thestationary one d. The spring is made fast to the frame of the vice by the screw h. After putting the double edge to be sewed in its place, the woman passes her needlesuccessively through all the teeth of the comb, and is sure of making a regular seam inevery direction, provided she is careful to make the needle graze along the bottom of thenotches. As soon as this piece is sewed, she presses down the pedal with her toes,whereby the jaws start asunder, allowing her to introduce a new seam, and so in quicksuccession. The comb may have any desired shape, straight or curved; and the teeth may be larger or smaller, according to the kind of work to be done. With this view, the combs might be changed as occasion requires; but it is more economical to have sets of vices ready mounted with combs of every requisite size and form. GLUCINA {Glucine, Fr.; Berryllerde, Germ.) is one of the primitive earths,

Text Appearing After Image:
606 GLUE. originally discovered by Vauquelin, in the beryl and emerald. It may be extractedfrom either of these minerals, by treating their powder successively with potash, withwater, and with muriatic acid. The solution by the latter, being evaporated to dryness,is to be digested with water, and filtered. On pouring carbonate of ammonia in excessinto the liquid, we form soluble muriate of ammonia, with insoluble carbonates of lime,chrome, and iron, as also carbonate of glucina, which may be dissolved out from the restby an excess of carbonate of ammonia. When the liquid is filtered anew, the glucinapasses through, and may be precipitated in the state of a carbonate by boiling the liquid,which expels the excess of ammonia. By washing, drying, and calcining the carbonate,pure glucina is obtained. It is a white insipid powder, infusible in the heal of a smithsforge, insoluble in water, but soluble in caustic potash and soda; as also, especially whenit is a hydrate, in carbonate of ammon

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