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Image from page 64 of “The fruits and fruit trees of America; or, the culture, propagation, and management, in the garden and orchard, of fruit trees generally; with descriptions of all the finest varieties of fruit, native and foreign, cultivated in this

Image from page 64 of “The fruits and fruit trees of America; or, the culture, propagation, and management, in the garden and orchard, of fruit trees generally; with descriptions of all the finest varieties of fruit, native and foreign, cultivated in this
Healing Arts
Identifier: fruitsfruittrees00down
Title: The fruits and fruit trees of America; or, the culture, propagation, and management, in the garden and orchard, of fruit trees generally; with descriptions of all the finest varieties of fruit, native and foreign, cultivated in this country
Year: 1857 (1850s)
Authors: Downing, A. J. (Andrew Jackson), 1815-1852 Downing, Charles, 1802-1885, ed
Subjects: Fruit-culture Fruit
Publisher: New York, Wiley & Halsted
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
dener, it of course depending upon the vigour of tho tree.In shortening the shoot, care should be taken to cut back to awood bud that will produce a shoot for the following year. Cutclose to the bud, so that the wound may heal the following sea-son. The following year each shoot at the extremities of theleading branches should produce, besides the leading shoot, oneon the upper and two on the under part, more or less, accordingto the vigour of the tree ; whilst each of the secondary branchesshould produce besides the leading shoot, one other placed nearto the bottom; for the grand art of pruning, in all systems towhich this class of trees is subjected, consists in preserving asufficient quantity of young wood at the bottom of the tree ; andon no account must the gardener cut away clean any shoots soplaced, without well considering if they will be w^anted, not onlyfor the present but for the future good appearance of the tree.The quantity of young wood annually laid in must depend upon

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 21. Fan-training complete. the vigour of the tree. It would be ridiculous to lay the samequantity into a weakly tree as into a tree in full vigour. Thegardener here must use his own judgment. But if any of theleading shoots manifest a disposition to outstrip the others, aportion of young shoots must be laid in, and a greater quantityof fruit suffered to ripen on the over-vigorous branch. At thesame time a smaller quantity of fruit than usual must be leftto ripen on the weaker branch. This will tend to restore theequilibrium better than any other method. Fig. 21, presents uswith the figure of a tree in a more advanced state well balanced,and well calculated for an equal distribution of the sap all overits surface. [AVe have varied this figure by representing it train-ed on a trellis, instead of a wall.] Whenever any of the lowershoots have advanced so far as to incommode the others, they 40 TRAINING. should be cut back to a yearling shoot; this will give themroom, and keep the low

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