Rainbow

Rainbow
Eyes Vision
A rainbow is an optical and meteorological phenomenon that causes a spectrum of light to appear in the sky when the Sun shines on to droplets of moisture in the Earth's atmosphere. It takes the form of a multicoloured arc. Rainbows caused by sunlight always appear in the section of sky directly opposite the sun.

In a "primary rainbow", the arc shows red on the outer part, and violet on the inner side. This rainbow is caused by light being refracted while entering a droplet of water, then reflected inside on the back of the droplet and refracted again when leaving it.

In a double rainbow, a second arc is seen outside the primary arc, and has the order of its colours reversed, red facing toward the other one, in both rainbows. This second rainbow is caused by light reflecting twice inside water droplets. The region between a double rainbow is dark, and is known as "Alexander's band" or "Alexander's dark band".

The rainbow is not located at a specific distance, but comes from any water droplets viewed from a certain angle relative to the Sun's rays. Thus, a rainbow is not a physical object, and cannot be physically approached. Indeed, it is impossible for an observer to manoeuvre to see any rainbow from water droplets at any angle other than the customary one of 42 degrees from the direction opposite the Sun. Even if an observer sees another observer who seems "under" or "at the end" of a rainbow, the second observer will see a different rainbow further off-yet, at the same angle as seen by the first observer.

A rainbow spans a continuous spectrum of colours. Any distinct bands perceived are an artefact of human colour vision, and no banding of any type is seen in a black-and-white photo of a rainbow, only a smooth gradation of intensity to a maximum, then fading towards the other side. For colours seen by a normal human eye, the most commonly cited and remembered sequence, in English, is Newton's sevenfold red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.

Rainbows can be caused by many forms of airborne water. These include not only rain, but also mist, spray, and airborne dew.

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Um arco-íris (também chamado arco-celeste, arco-da-aliança, arco-da-chuva, arco-da-velha) é um fenômeno óptico e meteorológico que separa a luz do sol em seu espectro (aproximadamente) contínuo quando o sol brilha sobre gotas de chuva. É um arco multicolorido com o vermelho no seu exterior e o violeta em seu interior; a ordem completa é vermelho, laranja, amarelo, verde, azul, anil (ou índigo) e violeta. No entanto, a grande maioria das pessoas consegue discernir apenas seis cores, e o próprio Newton viu apenas cinco cores, e adicionou mais duas apenas para fazer analogia com as sete notas musicais.[1][2][3][4] Ver também o artigo sobre as cores para informações sobre o espectro de cores do arco-íris.

Para ajudar a lembrar a sequência de cores do arco-íris, usa-se a mnemónica: «Vermelho lá vai violeta», em que l, a,v, a,i representam a sequência laranja, amarelo, verde, azul, índigo. Na língua inglesa é usada a mnemónica roygbiv.

O efeito do arco-íris pode ser observado sempre que existir gotas de água no ar e a luz do sol estiver brilhando acima do observador em uma baixa altitude ou ângulo. O mais espetacular arco-íris aparece quando metade do céu ainda está escuro com nuvens de chuva e o observador está em um local com céu claro. Outro local propício à apreciação do arco-íris é perto de cachoeiras.

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虹(にじ)とは、赤から紫までの光のスペクトルが並んだ円弧状の光である。気象現象の中でも大気光学現象に含まれる。

太陽の光が空気中の水滴によって屈折、反射されるときに、水滴がプリズムの役割をするため、光が分解されて複数色(日本では七色とされる)の帯に見える。雨上がり、水しぶきをあげる滝、太陽を背にしてホースで水まきをした時などに良く見ることができる。

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  • Copyright :Site original article,on July 26, 2017,by submission,Total 3151 words
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